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Let your fingers do the talking

This has been a great term of language learning! In addition to the pure language sessions that I’ve been doing with Year 2 pupils, I have had the opportunity to do fun craft activities and introduce the children to some foreign words at the same time.

During MOOT (Manage Our Own Time) sessions children can choose between different activities and each week I have a ‘language and culture’ table. In the summer term origami was very popular and fitted in nicely alongside the Japanese lessons. But at the start of the new school year I thought I’d begin with something more general – finger puppets! It’s a great way of getting kids to speak in another language and as the puppets I chose were of animals, we could learn how animal noises sound in different languages. (If you’d like to learn more, there’s an interesting Guardian article on the subject and of course James Chapman’s fab Soundimals book.)

Our languages this year are going to be German, Japanese and French, so I produced these fun sheets. We went through the pronounciation of each of the sounds – I think the Japanese onomatopeia  were the favourites as they were so different from the others. The children chose a finger puppet to make then drew a picture and wrote down the associated sounds. They then ran around with their finger puppets practising their new-found words.

Y2 - MOOT - GE 1 - pig.pages copyY2 - MOOT - GE 1 - mouse.pages copyY2 - MOOT - GE 1 - horse.pages copyY2 - MOOT - GE 1 - cat.pages copy

Just before Christmas I got the children making simple pop-up Christmas cards. On the front they wrote ‘Frohe Weihnachten’ and some simple German greetings inside. My version is quite dull compared with the colourful creations which were made in class!

Weihnachtskarte   Weihnachtskarte 2

The most popular vocabulary learning activities this term were: Jump-up numbers (you need strong thighs for this one as you start crouched down and count slowly from 1 to 10 in the target language, ending with jumping up with arms in the air and shouting out on 10); the companion activity is of course reversing the countdown and the movement, speaking more quietly as you go. Calling out ‘lecker!’ & ‘igitt!’ (yum! and yuk!) when I showed them pictures of traditional German Christmas foods was also great fun!

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