Always have another trick up your sleeve

Around bonfire night, it was of course a chance to talk about fireworks and throw in some vocabulary relating to colours. I thought it would be a great idea for all the children to have pretend sparklers (die Wunderkerze) to wave Wunderkerze strawsaround so I handed out bundles of coloured straws. Helpfully one child said that he had played with red sparklers over the weekend, which helped reinforce the idea. I waved my sparklers around whilst saying the German words for each colour and asked the children to do the same. I then challenged the class to wave the correct colour in response to me just repeating the vocabulary. Happily some children made the connection between the similar sounding words in German and English: rot – red; blau – blue; grün – green; gelb – yellow.

We then sang a song about fireworks – courtesy of Janet Lloyd’s fabulous blog ‘Primary Language Learning Today’ (there are versions in French, Spanish & German). This time our straws became fireworks (die Feuerwerke) and they blasted off into the sky during the song. And just to add a little more noise we practiced saying firework noises in German too 🙂 Krach! Puff! Rums! Bums! Wums!

By the way, die Wunderkerze literally translates as ‘miracle candles’ or ‘wonder candles’ – isn’t that great?

Now, the lesson I learnt from the children during this session was that, if you do one magic trick, you have to be prepared to do another. Last time I pretended that the children were working magic by waving magic wands at the whiteboard and making new images appear. Of course, this time round, some children wanted to use their pretend sparklers as magic wands, but as I wasn’t prepared with my hidden clicker, their magic spells didn’t work … I will have to think about how to sneak a magic trick into a future session!

ZaubertueteI think it didn’t help that I produced the ‘sparklers’ out of my Zaubertüte (magic bag) which many of the children took to be a kind of witch’s hat, as it is modelled on the Schultüte that children in German receive when they first start formal schooling. Schultüten are normally filled with sweets, toys and stationery. We did talk a little about the fact that German children start school at the age of 6 but the class was more interested in the idea that I might have lots of sweets in my version …

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